Thursday, June 21, 2018

Campus-Carry Bill Vetoed by Georgia Governor

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Perhaps the most enlightening evidence of the historical significance of prohibiting weapons on a college campus is found in the minutes of October 4, 1824, Board of Visitors of the newly created University of Virginia. Present for that meeting were Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, along with four other members. In that meeting of the Board of Visitors, detailed rules were set forth for the operation of the University which would open several months later. Under the rules relating to the conduct of students, it provided that “No student shall, within the precincts of the University, introduce, keep or use any spirituous or venomous liquors, keep or use weapons or arms of any kind…”   Gov. Nathan Deal

Georgia’s Republican governor, Nathan Deal, vetoed a bill on Tuesday that would have allowed students to bring guns on public university campuses, delivering a surprise blow to a movement that has successfully pushed to lift restrictions on carrying concealed firearms at colleges in eight other states.

Georgia students overwhelmingly opposed the campus carry bill in their state. Of 5,000 Georgia Tech students polled by the school’s student government, 70 percent said they opposed the bill, and only 23 percent said they supported it. The majority of the students at Georgia Tech also said concealed guns on campus would make them feel less safe. The bill was also unpopular among constituents. The Atlanta Journal-Constitutionpolled readers two years ago on the issue, at which point 78 percent of the respondents were against Georgia implementing campus carry.

In the immediate aftermath of the veto announcement, students in the University of Georgia system took to social media to celebrate the move.

 Georgia students overwhelmingly opposed the campus carry bill in their state. Of 5,000 Georgia Tech students polled by the school’s student government, 70 percent said they opposed the bill, and only 23 percent said they supported it. The majority of the students at Georgia Tech also said concealed guns on campus would make them feel less safe. The bill was also unpopular among constituents. The Atlanta Journal-Constitutionpolled readers two years ago on the issue, at which point 78 percent of the respondents were against Georgia implementing campus carry.

In Tennessee, Haslam had also expressed reservations about legislation that will make it easier for faculty and other university employees to carry guns on public campuses. In a survey, 87 percent of University of Tennessee faculty indicated that they “strongly disagree” that allowing guns on campus is “in the best interest of the community.”

The NRA issued a response:

“We agreed with Governor Deal when he said that the arguments against the campus safety bill lacked validity. He was right then, but he is wrong today,” said NRA spokeswoman Catherine Mortensen. “It is unfortunate that Governor Deal vetoed a bill that would have made Georgia campuses safer for his constituents. The NRA is thankful to Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and the legislators who worked to protect law-abiding citizens’ constitutional right to self-defense on campus and we look forward to working with them next session to pass this important safety legislation.”

Legislators instrumental in passing the campus safety legislation include Representatives Rick Jasperse, Mandi Ballinger, Alan Powell, John Meadows, David Ralston and Senator Jesse Stone.

Governor Deal’s February 29, 2016 comments regarding the arguments against the bill he vetoed today: “We heard all the hype that we’re now hearing about campus carry, all the predictions of tragedies. All the predictions that we were going to open our state up to a Wild West scenario. Those earlier fears don’t appear to have come true. So, therefore, to use those kind of arguments with the campus carry discussion, I think lacks validity.” Governor Nathan Deal, Atlanta Journal Constitution

Source: The Trace –Pro-Gun Governor Vetoes Campus Carry Bill in Georgia

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